Climate Change

Using radio to builds herders’ trust in livestock insurance in Isiolo County

The Kenya Livestock Insurance Program (KLIP) insures the livestock of pastoralists in the arid and semi-arid counties of Kenya. Implemented with technical assistance from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), KLIP limits livestock losses through early compensation allowing pastoralists to protect their assets. Payouts are pegged to measurements of forage conditions made via satellite data on vegetation cover to derive an index of seasonal forage availability/scarcity. Once payouts are triggered, registered pastoralists in the affected areas are eligible for compensation.

Read this post by the Thompson Reuters Foundation on how radio is being used to build pastoralists’ trust in livestock insurance in Kenya’s Isiolo County.

 

Crowdsourcing: an approach to revolutionize and improve rangeland monitoring

Crowdsourcing, which is outsourcing work to an undefined and often large group of people, is an innovative data collection approach that could be exploited to provide information on rangelands forage conditions to improve rangeland management programs.

http://hdl.handle.net/10568/89002

A recent study by the Crowdsourcing for Rangeland Conditions project—implemented through a collaboration between the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Cornell University and the University of Sydney—applied a crowdsourcing approach to collect detailed information on forage conditions in northern Kenya.

For more than a decade, the satellite-based advanced very-high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR) sensor has been in use. It provided daily time series of normalized differences vegetation index (NDVI) data from across the earth. However, the resolution is inadequate to distinguish between plant species and the palatability of the vegetation.

The study showed that crowdsourcing can be used to seal gaps in the AVHRR method by using digital technology and local knowledge to gather low-cost and near real-time data on vegetation type, palatability and carrying capacity to improve existing forage models relying on remotely sensed data.

Researchers in this study used crowdsourcing to collect accurate, low-cost and real-time data on rangeland conditions. According to the findings, the approach has the potential to revolutionize and improve the process of rangeland monitoring and could be used by the National Drought Management Authority to validate and expand their existing monitoring systems.

Findings from this study could also be used to calibrate the index used by the ILRI-led Index-Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) project.

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Largest-ever micro-insurance payout made to Ethiopian pastoralists

ILRI news

Pastoralist receive an indemnity payment after livestock losses More than 2,250 pastoralists received insurance payouts following the extremely poor rains this year in southern Ethiopia.

More than 2,250 pastoralists received insurance payouts following the extremely poor rains this year in southern Ethiopia. Low levels of rainfall have led to the loss of approximately 300,000 livestock in 2017 in the Borana zone of the southern Oromia region. The insurance payouts of more than ETB 5.233 million (USD 220,000) was the largest-ever micro-insurance indemnity made in Ethiopia. Each insured pastoralist received an average of ETB 2,255 (USD 96), which will allow the herders to purchase feeds for their surviving animals and to restock their herds.

Pastoralists in northern Kenya and southern Ethiopia have been insured by an index-based livestock insurance (IBLI) scheme devised in 2008 by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and its technical partners at Cornell University and the University of California at Davis. The Ethiopian component of…

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Record payouts being made by Kenya Government and insurers to protect herders facing historic drought

ILRI news

klip_cropped02From left to right: Jimmy Smith, director general of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI); Andrew Tuimur, principal secretary in Kenya’s State Department of Livestock; and Willy Bett, cabinet secretary for the Kenya Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries during a press conference held on 20 Feb 2017 announcing payments to more than 12,000 pastoral households under the Kenya Livestock Insurance Program (KLIP) (photo credit: ILRI/Dorine Odongo).

More than Ksh214 million is on tap for 12,000 pastoral households in six counties of northern Kenya through innovative policies that use satellite imagery to trigger payments for feed, veterinary supplies and water.

As an epic drought desiccates fields and forages in the Horn of Africa, Government of Kenya officials, in partnership with Kenyan insurers, today announced payments to over 12,000 pastoral households under a breakthrough livestock insurance plan—one that uses satellites to monitor vegetation available to livestock and triggers assistance for feed, veterinary medicines and even…

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Why direct climate funding to African farmers will pay off

As the world descends on Morocco for the annual United Nations climate conference, the host nation is championing an unlikely hero: African agriculture.

After launching the ambitious Adaptation of African Agriculture (AAA) initiative in September, the Moroccan government seeks to mobilise $30bn of investment for the sector that is under the most significant threat from climate change, in the region that is the least equipped to deal with it. According to current estimates, the negative effects of climate change are already reducing Africa’s GDP by about 1.4 per cent, and the costs arising from adaptation to climate change are set to reach an annual three per cent of GDP by 2030. A principal victim of this is the agriculture sector, which not only feeds the chronically food-insecure continent, but forms the backbone of its economy and its route out of poverty.

A new study out this week led by the International Fund for Agricultural Development shows that Morocco’s approach may well be on the right track. It confirms that investment in climate-sensitive approaches for smallholder farmers can more than double farmer incomes – meaning directing climate funding for adaptation in African agriculture would make both climate and economic sense.

However, Africa currently only attracts around 5 per cent of climate funding. This is despite the fact that six of the 10 countries most affected by climate change are in Africa, and every single African nation that submitted climate adaptation strategies to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris last year, included agriculture in its plans. Read more

RESULTS UK policy report features lessons from IBLI

A new policy report published by RESULTS UK this week, highlights the Index-Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI) Program in Kenya, as one of the initiatives that are successfully reaching vulnerable people with climate risk insurance in developing countries.

The report, which was launched 11 May 2016 ahead of the World Humanitarian Summit, highlights ‘unprecedented opportunities for donors to reach an additional 400 million vulnerable people with climate risk insurance by 2020 through the G7 “InsuResilience” Initiative’. It brings together a weight of evidence about the protective, promotive and transformative effects of insurance in building climate resilience. The report also includes a series of case-studies demonstrating the real impacts of cutting-edge weather-based insurance programs.

Experiences from IBLI in Kenya, were used by the government in Kenya to launch the ‘Kenyan Livestock Insurance Programme’ which is covering small-scale farmers and herders against weather-related crop failure and loss of livestock.

Read the whole report: Weathering a risky climate: New policy report launched by RESULTS UK.

Index Based Livestock Insurance (IBLI), E-learning Course Launch

Elearning launchAre you interested in knowing just how Index Based Livestock Insurance works? Lessons on IBLI and the Asset Protection Contract are now just a click away! You can easily access your IBLI lessons from ILRI’s e-Learning portal http://learning.ilri.org/.  The IBLI e-Learning course was launched on the 22nd of March 2016 at the International Livestock Research Institute’s (ILRI) campus in Nairobi, Kenya. Various stakeholders including Kenya Government officials from the State Department of Livestock (SDL), insurance companies, donor organizations and partner NGOs attended the launch ceremony. In his opening remarks, ILRI’s Director General Dr. Jimmy Smith reiterated the fact that Capacity Development is a critical success factor for ILRI and that stakeholders must focus on enhancing pastoralism as it is a major contributor to the national Gross Domestic Product.

Read more …..

 

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